Summer School on Sustainable Aviation

Prof. Lavoie - Active-flow-control-of-a-blunt-trailing-edge-airfoil-using-plasma-actuators-flow-is-from-bottom-right-to-top-left-of-picture

Every year, UTIAS runs a Summer School on Sustainable Aviation in late May or early June, with international experts on an annually selected theme relevant to development of environmentally sustainable aircraft.

The theme of this year’s event is:

 

2016 Active Flow Control for

Drag and Noise Reduction

 

It is essential that the aviation industry reduce the environmental impacts of the operation of aircraft.  Noise pollution, particularly in the proximity of airports, is of great concern to modern aircraft and engine manufacturers. Manufacturing and operating aircraft demand materials, energy and resources. The emissions created by burning jet fuel cause air pollution and, over decades, climate change: commercial aviation produces 4.9% of the total human contribution to global warming.

Active flow control is an important technology for reducing noise pollution and drag in the future. Improved aerodynamics through active flow control and drag reduction is one important means of reducing aircraft fuel consumption and emissions.

This event is designed for industry, academic and government attendees.  Students are encouraged to attend.

Space is limited and registration is required.

The topics covered previously and to be covered in the future are:

2013 Atmospheric physics and life cycle assessment
2014 Aeroacoustics
2015 Gas Turbine Combustion
2016 Active Flow Control for Drag and Noise Reduction
2017 Topology Optimisation

 

2016 Schedule
Abstracts
Fees
Venue
Accommodations
Organizing Committee
Contact Information


2016 Schedule

 

Monday, May 16, 2016

9:00am – 9:10am Introduction, David Zingg
9:10am – 10:30am Introduction to flow control for aerodynamic applications
Jean-Paul Bonnet, Research Director emeritus from CNRS, in the French laboratory Pprime in Poitiers, France
10:30am – 10:40am Break with refreshments
10:40am – 12:00pm Introduction to flow control for aerodynamic applications
Jean-Paul Bonnet, Research Director emeritus from CNRS, in the French laboratory Pprime in Poitiers, France
12:00pm – 1:30pm Lunch will be provided
1:30pm – 3:00pm Boundary Layer Control
Jonathan Morrison,  Chair of Experimental Fluid Mechanics, Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College, UK
3:00pm – 3:10pm Break with refreshments
3:00pm – 4:30pm Boundary Layer Control 
Jonathan Morrison,  Chair of Experimental Fluid Mechanics, Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College, UK

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

9:00am – 10:30am Control of separated flows
Philippe Lavoie, University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies
10:30am – 10:40am Break with refreshments
10:40am – 12:00pm Control of separated flows
Philippe Lavoie, University of Toronto Institute for Aeropsace Studies
12:00pm – 1:30pm Lunch will be provided
1:30pm – 3:00pm Controlling sound generation in turbulent flows
Tim Colonius, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, California Institute of Technology.
3:00pm – 3:10pm Break with refreshments
3:00pm – 4:30pm
Controlling sound generation in turbulent flows
Tim Colonius, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, California Institute of Technology.

 


Abstracts

 

Introduction to flow control for aerodynamic applications

Jean-Paul Bonnet, Research Director emeritus from CNRS

This lecture will introduce fundamental concepts on flow control strategies applied to aerodynamic problems.  We begin by reviewing the environmental and industrial requirements/expectations, focusing on aeronautical and automotive applications. Then we will recall the basis of flow control strategies based either on stability approaches or considering the turbulent character of most of flows of industrial interest. We will discuss on the different methods for extracting coherent structures in turbulent flows in view of their control. We will also address the description of turbulent shear flows in terms of time and space scales useful for flow control strategies. The more popular actuators for active flow control will briefly be described with their specific characteristics. Some illustrations will be given for wall bounded of free shear flows.

Dr. JP Bonnet is Research Director emeritus from CNRS, in the French laboratory Pprime in Poitiers, France. His primary research interests are experimental fluid dynamics, particularly turbulence (incompressible and subsonic) and active flow control.  He received Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1975 from University of Poitiers and a second thesis in 1982 after a post doctoral stay at UMIST with Prof. BE Launder. In the 80’s, he addressed the problem of turbulence in supersonic. He provides new insights in this domain and contributes to set up the law of spreading rates of supersonic mixing layers. More recently his current research interests in active flow control and aeroacoustics: control of separation on subsonic airfoils, control of vectoring and mixing in supersonic flows, transonic buffet control and jet noise control with original pneumatic arrangements and control via DBD plasma methods.  He is the co-author (chief investigator) of 10 EU Patents, produces more 80  international journals, co-edited one book on flow control with M Gad-el-Hak and A. Pollard (Lecture Notes in Physics 1998) and co-authored with T. Gatski a book “Turbulence and High speed flows” including flow control aspects in the  second edition in 2013. He is associated editor of “International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flows” and “International Journal of Flow Control

 

Boundary Layer Control

Jonathan Morrison,  Chair of Experimental Fluid Mechanics, Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College, UK

  • Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave cancellation
    • Experimental setup, receptivity
    • Orr-Sommerfeld equation, trigger of 2D / 3D TS waves
    • Hot wire sensor, jet control, transfer functions
    • Feedforward control, cancellation by superposition
    • Modelling for feedback control, stability
    • Results using PI control, H2
  • Transient growth: a linear paradigm for near-wall turbulence control
    • Basic description of 3D disturbances, Orr-Sommerfeld Squire formulation
    • Experimental setup
    • Hot-wire sensing, plasma forcing
    • Feedforward and feedback control
  • Role of linear feedback control in turbulent channel flow
    • Linearised Navier-Stokes: conservative nature of nonlinearity (Reynolds-Orr)
    • OSS: control of coupling v’dU/dy
    • Passivity theorem
    • Controller action – relaminarisation
    • Explanation of controller action: role of pressure, Landahl timescales
  • Open-loop control and travelling surface waves for turbulent skin-friction reduction
    • Results from DNS
    • Kagome lattice actuation – a practical system for low Reynolds numbers
    • Description of surface motion
    • Drag reduction, analysis of near-wall boundary layer response
  • Summary and prospects

 

Professor Jonathan Morrison holds the chair of Experimental Fluid Mechanics in the Department of Aeronautics at Imperial College. He received his PhD from the University of Durham in 1982 and became a member of faculty at Imperial College in 1991 after a brief period as Senior Development Engineer at GEC-ALSTHOM Turbine Generators.  He is Principal Investigator of the National Wind Tunnel Facility funded by EPSRC and ATI (http://www.nwtf.ac.uk).  He chairs its Management Board.  He was lead author on the EPSRC Roadmap, “Provision of Internationally Leading Wind Tunnel Infrastructure”.

His recent work has focused on fundamentals of wall turbulence including coherent structures and their relation to changes in imposed length-scale, energy transfer and pressure fluctuations. Novel approaches to flow control involve Electro-Active Polymers (EAP) both as actuators, and as surface-pressure sensors, including ink-jet printing techniques. Travelling surface waves for drag reduction are being developed with support from Airbus and EPSRC. Novel algorithms have been formulated for real-time feedback control using wall-based sensing and actuation. Flaps and high-frequency pulsed jets are being used for feedback control of separated flows with support from Imperial Innovations and Climate KIC. Recent work involves fundamental studies of the effects of large roughness on turbulent channel flow and turbulent boundary layers and, as part of the LFC-UK EPSRC Programme Grant, studies of receptivity and transition in two- and three-dimensional boundary layers.

Control of separated flows
Philippe Lavoie, University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies

This lecture will focus on flow control techniques applied to the control of separated shear layers. The first section of the lecture will deal with the control of separation from streamlined bodies where the point of separation can be variable (e.g., airfoils). A particular attention will be placed on open-loop unsteady forcing using nominally two-dimensional and three-dimensional actuation. Promising closed-loop approaches will also be discussed. The second portion of the lecture will focus on separation control from bluff bodies, for which the point of separation is often fixed or not easily varied. For this type of approach, the control strategy is more focused on changing the evolution of the wake. Both passive and active control methods will be considered, with a particular emphasis on pressure drag reduction.

Philippe Lavoie is Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies. His research interests are in the fields of modern flow control and turbulence, primarily from an experimental perspective. He is particularly concerned with the study of transitional and turbulent flows, as well as the flow structures and instabilities associated with these phenomena. The focus of his research is to investigate the fundamental dynamics of attached and separated shear layers, and how these can be manipulated to improve flow characteristics with respect to specific goals, such as skin-friction drag reduction and mitigating noise emissions. The overarching aim is to develop novel flow control strategies, based on modern approaches, and the instrumentation and tools required to implement passive or active control techniques in an experimental framework and real life applications, such as on the surface of an aircraft. The motivation at the core of this research is the reduction of greenhouse gas emission in commercial transport industries, in particular aviation, through improved fluid system efficiency.

 

Controlling sound generation in turbulent flows

Tim Colonius, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, California Institute of Technology

This lecture will focus on flow control techniques applied to aeroacoustic phenomena.  We begin by reviewing the physics of sound generation by turbulence and essential computational and experimental techniques for their study.  Self-susstained flow-acoustic and thermo-acoustic oscillations are discussed next, along with open- and closed-loop methods for tone and broadband noise suppression.  In the second half of the lecture, turbulent jet noise is discussed with a special emphasis on wavepacket structures that  comprise the dominant source of mixing noise.  An attempt is made to unify techniques for noise reduction through passive (serrated nozzles) and active (e.g. fluidic injection) means in terms of their impact on the evolution of wavepackets.

Tim Colonius is Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology.  He received his B.S. from the University of Michigan in 1987 and M.S and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University in 1988 and 1994, respectively.   He joined Caltech in 1994, where he and his group use numerical simulations to study a range of problems in fluid mechanics, including aeroacoustics, flow control, instabilities, shock waves, and bubble dynamics.   Prof. Colonius also investigates cavitation in medical applications of shock waves and ultrasound, and is a member of the Medical Engineering faculty at Caltech.  He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and has held visiting positions at Cambridge University and the University of Poitiers.  He is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Theoretical and Computational Fluid Dynamics.


Fees

   Early Bird
(ends April 15)
Standard
Students   $200 $300
Academic or
Industrial Guests
  $450 $600

 


Venue

All sessions will take place in the main lecture hall at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies.

Lecture Hall
Institute for Aerospace Studies
University of Toronto
4925 Dufferin Street
Toronto, ON
M3H 5T6

Tourist Information
http://www.toronto.com/
http://www.seetorontonow.com/


Accommodations

Novotel

Conference delegates are encouraged stay at the Novotel North York. Situated in Uptown Toronto, Novotel Toronto North York offers a modern destination that has upscale amenities, such as complimentary WiFi, a full service restaurant, and an indoor saltwater pool. The University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) has secured a corporate rate of $109* per night.

The corporate rate will expire on April 23rd, 2016.

Novotel North York
3 Park Home Avenue
North York, Ontario, M2N 6L3
Tel: 416-733-2929

Check-in time is after 3:00 pm and check-out time is before 12 Noon
Parking: $17.00 with in and out privileges
Reservations: Please call Novotel directly to secure reservations, 416-733-2929 on or before April 23rd, 2016. The rooms are booked under the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies.

* All rates are subject to applicable taxes
* Quoted rates are not guaranteed after 4:00pm on April, 23rd, 2016


Organizing Committee

 

Georgette Stubbs
Administrator for the  Centre for Research in Sustainable Aviation,
stubbs@utias.utoronto.ca
David Zingg
Director, University of Toronto Institute
for Aerospace Studies and Centre for Research in Sustainable Aviation
dwz@oddjob.utias.utoronto.ca
Philippe Lavoie
Associate Director, Centre for
Research in Sustainable Aviation
lavoie@utias.utoronto.ca
Craig Steeves
Associate Director, Centre for Research in Sustainable Aviation
csteeves@utias.utoronto.ca

 


Contact Information

Please direct general inquires to Georgette Stubbs.

Georgette Stubbs
Administrator for the Centre for Research in Sustainable Aviation
Phone: 416-667-7796
stubbs@utias.utoronto.ca
sustainable.aviation@utias.utoronto.ca

Mailing Addresss:
Centre for Research in Sustainable Aviation
Institute for Aerospace Studies
University of Toronto
4925 Dufferin Street
Toronto, ON M3H 5T6