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UTIAS Grads Make Aviation History for the Second Time

UTIAS grads Dr. Todd Reichert and Cameron Robertson led a team of U of T engineering grads and students and made history when they won the prestigious Sikorsky Human Powered Helicopter Challenge.  Read the full story…

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New UTIAS Program in Sustainable Aviation

The Centre for Research in Sustainable Aviation (CRSA) was established to help equip future scientists and engineers with the skills to develop environmentally sustainable aircraft.  Find out more…

Inside U of T's MarsDome, an enclosed testing facility modified to simulate an extraterrestrial surface (photo by Roberta Baker and Deb Hazlewood)
Robots crawl, swim, and fly across the UTIAS MarsDome

Robotics experts in sensory perception, artificial intelligence, mechatronics, autonomous robots, and advanced control systems technology joined in the NCFRN trials at the UTIAS MarsDome   Read the full article

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Pilotless Planes May Hold Key to Spotting Forest Fires

UTIAS’s Prof. Hugh Liu, Brican Flight Systems, and MNR are helping to detect forest fires with pilotless planes.  Read about the successful test…

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UTIAS Student Team Test Fires Rocket Engine

On August 13, 2013 undergraduate and graduate students from the University of Toronto Aeronautics Team Rocketry Division (UTAT Rocketry) performed a static test fire of their hybrid rocket engine.  Watch the test…

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Downsview Aerospace Hub

The Downsview aerospace hub would include universities, colleges, industries, and SMEs.  Matt Nicholls writes about the real rewards of such a cluster

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“UTIAS is a world class aerospace department … without doubt the top aerospace department in Canada.”   UTIAS External Review

The academic program in aerospace science and engineering at the University of Toronto includes undergraduate and graduate studies. Our undergraduate program is offered through the Engineering Science Program. At the graduate level we offer research-intensive programs leading to MASc and PhD degrees, and a professionally-oriented program leading to the MEng degree. The scope of our research includes aeronautical engineering (aircraft flight systems, propulsion, aerodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, and structural mechanics) and space systems engineering (spacecraft dynamics and control, space robotics and mechatronics, and microsatellite technology).

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Latest UTIAS News

Drones could keep watchful eye on construction sites

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), commonly known as drones, act as sensors in the sky and could change the way inspections are carried out, providing a whole new view on construction sites, states Professor Angela Schoellig of the Institute for Aerospace Studies at the University of Toronto.

U of T Engineering receives over $1 million in CFI research funding

Somewhere across a massive water system, a toxic bloom of algae is polluting drinking water. But what’s the fastest way to find it? To U of T Engineering professor Angela Schoellig (UTIAS), the answer is flying drones—an entire swarm designed to zigzag across landscapes and spot environmental hazards. Schoellig and her pioneering drone development is […]

UTIAS Alumna Named On The Forbes 30 Under 30 List

Congratulations to Natalie Panek, an engineer at MDA Robotics, and a UTIAS alumna, who has been named on the Forbes 30 Under 30 list. Some of the amazing work that Natalie does to encourage girls in science can be seen on her blog “ThePanekRoom”.

Drone Plus Drum Machine Equals This Killer Flying Musical Instrument

A Research collaboration between the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) and WaveDNA resulted in a drone drum. The drum experiment wasn’t just about building a newfangled instrument. It was designed to test how humans can interact with robots, specifically flying ones. Details and video here.

How do I leave a footprint when I’m not touching the ground?

Jets, once the epitome of exotic travel, now face a hard truth: lifting a crowd of people into the sky and carrying them a long distance requires a large amount of energy. High fuel consumption and carbon footprints, in part, can temper the thrill of takeoff, burdening it with ecological guilt.